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NIH 1998 Almanac/The Organization/CIT/      

Center for Information Technology: Research Programs


The CIT consists of the Office of Computing Resources and Services (OCRS), the Office of Computational Bioscience (OCB), Office of Telecommunications Management (OTM) and the Office of Information Resources Management (OIRM).

Office of Computing Resources and Services

The Computing Facilities Branch (CFB) manages, operates, and supports central computing resources for NIH enterprise use in both scientific and administrative programs and for use by other Government agencies. Current resources include: an MVS mainframe system; a Silicon Graphics Inc. (SGI) system, a Convex supercomputer the Advanced Laboratory Workstation System; and (with the Computational Bioscience and Engineering Laboratory) Intel and IBM SP highly parallel supercomputers. In addition, CFB provides interoperability among these resources and with other computing facilities.

The Customer Services Branch (CSB) supplies centralized, integrated computer support services to the NIH community and to CIT’s customers in other Federal agencies. CSB advocates customer needs to CIT management. CSB represents CIT services and policies to customers; maintains and operates the Technical Assistance Support Center--CIT’s central point of contact for computing support; consults with customers to resolve computing problems; provides advice regarding PC, Macintosh, LAN and mainframe use; establishes customer accounts for CIT systems; develops and manages the CIT computer training program; and distributes technical information, vendor documentation, and certain software.

The Information Systems Branch (ISB) provides requirements analysis, database design, systems analysis, and programming services. ISB develops and maintains many CIT-supported NIH production database applications and provides direct user support for online production database systems and information processing systems; tracks and evaluates emerging database technologies; collaborates with the ICs in application development to determine the feasibility of new database technologies; provides application programming for ICD systems that require the use of proven DBMS technologies; and develops user documentation to support database applications.

The Network Systems Branch (NSB) furnishes networking hardware and software infrastructure and support, which allow diverse computer systems within NIH to share information with each other and with national and international communities. NSB designs, engineers, supports, and administers the campus-wide network--NIHnet, and provides support and guidance for the NIH community regarding the use of local area networks (LANs).

The Technology Resources Branch (TRB) offers computing and communication support services to the NIH community via contract staff. TRB services include: on-site LAN and desktop support; information technology assessment; Web publishing; technical consulting; CERTAN management; and evaluation/support for programs for sequence analysis and use of the World Wide Web for sequence analysis.

The Statistical Support Staff (SSS) supplies support to the biostatisticians and biomedical researchers; conducts consultations on quantitative analysis and associated computer use; and selects, maintains, and supports mathematical and statistical software for NIH mainframes, PCs, and workstations.

Office of Computational Bioscience

The Computational Bioscience and Engineering Laboratory (CBEL) exploits high performance computer systems in biomedical applications including: image processing; structural biology; computational chemistry; medical imaging; scientific visualization; signal processing; genetic database searching; genetic linkage analysis; and advanced statistical methods.

The Mathematical and Statistical Computing Laboratory (MSCL) engages in biophysical and biomedical research using advanced mathematical and physical techniques. The research is mainly collaborative with NIH scientists, and research areas include applied diffusion theory, biomedical imaging modalities, and data compression.

The Center for Molecular Modeling (CMM) sponsors the NIH Interinstitute Molecular Modeling Interest Group (MMIG) and provides computational chemistry and structural biology support to NIH scientists. CMM collaborates with and offers scientific and technical guidance in computation to the NIH research community. The branch also maintains a collection of molecular modeling software accessible to MMIG members via a virtual network of servers and workstations (MMIGNet).

The Scientific Computing Resource Center (SCRC) offers expertise in and access to scientific software and specialized hardware for the NIH Community. SCRC features the following at a shared-use facility: knowledgeable support staff; Silicon Graphics, Windows, and Macintosh workstations; color printers; film, flatbed, and slide scanners; and over 100 software titles.

Office of Telecommunications Management

OTM manages and directs the NIH telecommunications systems and administers the telecommunications budget. It develops technical requirements for the ICs and implements telecommunications programs to meet the needs of the NIH community. OTM is the focal point for service orders and billing, and developing and disseminating policies and procedures for the nationwide implementation and management of the NIH telecommunication systems. It also serves as the liaison for NIH with other Federal agencies, GSA, DHHS, and private industry.

Office of Information Resources Management

OIRM advises the chief information officer on the direction and management of NIH information technology (IT) program activities under the Paperwork Reduction Act, the Computer Security Act, the Information Technology Management Reform Act, and OMB Circular A-l30. OIRM serves as a focal point for implementing, managing, and overseeing NIH IT activities related to: IT policy, planning and budgeting; IT resources user requirements; IT reviews; automated systems inventories; capacity management and planning; security; IT standards, and IT resources obsolescence and excess equipment. OIRM also collaborates with NIH components responsible for: acquisition of IT resources; major information systems; telecommunications management, printing management, computer matching; IT accommodations for persons with disabilities; records and forms management including the Privacy Act; information collection, and information dissemination; serving as the NIH liaison to the Department and to OMB, GSA, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology and other Federal agencies on all IT matters; participating with appropriate NIH components in assessing and enhancing the level of knowledge and skill of users of IT resources; coordinating with appropriate NIH components in developing an NIH-wide plan for standardizing networking, cabling, and electrical facilities for IT resources; ensuring that oversight measures are appropriate for the diversity, complexity, and size of the major providers and the individual institutes and centers (ICs); and provides direction to the major providers and individual ICs in enhancing and strengthening individual IT program management ensuring compliance with legislative mandates.

OTM manages and directs the NIH telecommunications systems and administers the telecommunications budget. It develops technical requirements for the ICs and implements telecommunications programs to meet the needs of the NIH community. OTM is the focal point for service orders and billing, and developing and disseminating policies and procedures for the nationwide implementation and management of the NIH telecommunication systems. It also serves as the liaison for NIH with other Federal agencies, GSA, DHHS, and private industry.

Office of Information Resources Management

OIRM advises the chief information officer on the direction and management of NIH information technology (IT) program activities under the Paperwork Reduction Act, the Computer Security Act, the Information Technology Management Reform Act, and OMB Circular A-l30. OIRM serves as a focal point for implementing, managing, and overseeing NIH IT activities related to: IT policy, planning and budgeting; IT resources user requirements; IT reviews; automated systems inventories; capacity management and planning; security; IT standards, and IT resources obsolescence and excess equipment. OIRM also collaborates with NIH components responsible for: acquisition of IT resources; major information systems; telecommunications management, printing management, computer matching; IT accommodations for persons with disabilities; records and forms management including the Privacy Act; information collection, and information dissemination; serving as the NIH liaison to the Department and to OMB, GSA, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology and other Federal agencies on all IT matters; participating with appropriate NIH components in assessing and enhancing the level of knowledge and skill of users of IT resources; coordinating with appropriate NIH components in developing an NIH-wide plan for standardizing networking, cabling, and electrical facilities for IT resources; ensuring that oversight measures are appropriate for the diversity, complexity, and size of the major providers and the individual institutes and centers (ICs); and provides direction to the major providers and individual ICs in enhancing and strengthening individual IT program management ensuring compliance with legislative mandates.


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