DHHS, NIH News  
National Institute of Diabetes and
Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
The National Kidney and Urologic Diseases
Information Clearinghouse (NKUDIC)

For Immediate Release
Friday, August 1, 2008

Mary M. Harris

NIDDK Publishes New Resources about Urologic and Kidney Disorders

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has published several new resources to help people learn more about urologic and kidney disorders. These disorders are among the most critical health problems in the United States, affecting millions of Americans, including children and young adults. The publications address interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS), urinary tract infections (UTIs) in children, prostatitis, IgA nephropathy, and home hemodialysis.

  • What I need to know about Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome. People with IC/PBS usually have pain when the bladder fills and empties. Although the pain might disappear for weeks or even months, it then returns. Finding a proper diagnosis for IC/PBS can be frustrating because symptoms can resemble those of other conditions. The NIDDK’s booklet helps people understand the difference between IC/PBS and other sources of bladder pain. The resource also explains the tests and treatments for IC/PBS, including bladder retraining, physical therapy, physical activity, stress reduction, medication, bladder stretching, nerve stimulation, and surgery. For an online version of this booklet, go to www.kidney.niddk.nih.gov/kudiseases/pubs/interstitialcystitis_ez.

  • What I need to know about My Child’s Urinary Tract Infection. UTIs affect about 3 percent of children in the United States annually. Throughout childhood, the risk of having a UTI is 2 percent for boys and 8 percent for girls. UTIs account for more than 1 million visits to pediatricians’ offices each year. This easy-to-read booklet explains the symptoms of UTIs, how doctors diagnose and treat them, and how to prevent them. Symptoms of UTIs are not always obvious to parents, and younger children are usually unable to describe how they feel. However, recognizing and treating UTIs are important because lack of treatment can lead to serious and even life-threatening kidney problems. What I need to know about My Child’s Urinary Tract Infection is available online at www.kidney.niddk.nih.gov/kudiseases/pubs/utichildren_ez.

  • Prostatitis: Disorders of the Prostate. This fact sheet describes the four types of prostatitis: acute bacterial prostatitis, chronic bacterial prostatitis, chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome, and asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis. Prostatitis, or inflammation of the prostate, is an often painful condition that affects mostly young and middle-aged men. Symptoms — which include painful or burning urination and incomplete bladder emptying — can vary or mimic signs of other illnesses, making diagnosis difficult. The fact sheet also explains how doctors diagnose and treat prostatitis. An online version of the fact sheet is available at www.kidney.niddk.nih.gov/kudiseases/pubs/prostatitis.

  • IgA Nephropathy. This fact sheet explains IgA nephropathy, a kidney disorder that occurs when IgA, a protein that fights infection, settles in the kidneys. Over time, IgA deposits can cause the kidneys to leak blood and sometimes protein into urine. Kidney damage, and even kidney failure, can eventually result. The fact sheet also describes the risk factors, signs, causes, diagnosis, and available treatment for the condition. For an online copy of the fact sheet, go to www.kidney.niddk.nih.gov/kudiseases/pubs/iganephropathy.

  • Home Hemodialysis. In addition to standard hemodialysis treatment — which involves going to a clinic three times a week for care — a growing number of hemodialysis clinics have begun to offer treatment at home. Hemodialysis is a life-preserving treatment for hundreds of thousands of Americans with kidney failure. But standard treatment can be taxing and inconvenient for people with kidney failure. This fact sheet explains what is involved in receiving hemodialysis treatment at home, including the risks, advantages, and obstacles. Home Hemodialysis is available at www.kidney.niddk.nih.gov/kudiseases/pubs/homehemodialysis.

  • To order copies of NIDDK publications, go to www.kidney.niddk.nih.gov and click on “Order Publications” and then on “Kidney and Urologic Diseases Materials.” The NIDDK produces fact sheets and booklets about a multitude of issues related to kidney and urologic function. The website’s A to Z list includes all kidney and urologic publications in alphabetical order.

    Publications also can be ordered by calling the National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NKUDIC), an information dissemination service of the NIDDK, at 1–800–891–5390 or writing to the NKUDIC at 3 Information Way, Bethesda, MD 20892–3580. Single copies of NKUDIC publications are free. Packets of 25 copies of booklets and fact sheets cost $10 and $5, respectively, to cover shipping and handling.

    The NKUDIC was created in 1987 to increase knowledge and understanding about diseases of the kidneys and urologic system among people with these conditions and their families, health care professionals, and the general public. To carry out this mission, the NKUDIC works closely with a coordinating panel of representatives from federal agencies, national voluntary organizations, and professional groups to identify and respond to information needs about kidney and urologic diseases.

    The NIDDK conducts and supports research on diabetes and other endocrine and metabolic diseases; digestive diseases, nutrition, and obesity; and kidney, urologic, and hematologic diseases. For more information about the NIDDK and its programs, see www.niddk.nih.gov.

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) — The Nation's Medical Research Agency — includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. It is the primary federal agency for conducting and supporting basic, clinical and translational medical research, and it investigates the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit www.nih.gov.

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