DHHS, NIH News  
 
 
National Cancer Institute

EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE
Wednesday, March 28, 2007
12:01 a.m. DST


Subscribe
  CONTACT:
NCI Office of Media Relations
301-496-6641

Shawn Farley
ACRIN Public Relations Manager
703-648-8936

MRI Detects Cancers in the Opposite Breast of Women Newly Diagnosed with Breast Cancer

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scans of women who were diagnosed with cancer in one breast detected over 90 percent of cancers in the other breast that were missed by mammography and clinical breast exam at initial diagnosis, according to a new study. Given the established rates of mammography and clinical breast exams for detecting cancer in the opposite, or contralateral breast, adding an MRI scan to the diagnostic evaluation effectively doubled the number of cancers immediately found in these women. The American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN) study, supported by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), appears in the March 29, 2007 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.*

“One in ten women diagnosed with cancer in one breast will develop the disease in the opposite breast. Having a better technique to find these cancers as early as possible will increase the chances of successful treatment,” said NIH Director Elias A. Zerhouni, M.D.

The ACRIN trial was designed to determine whether the use of MRI could improve upon clinical breast exam and mammography in detecting breast cancer in the opposite breast at the time of the initial breast cancer diagnosis. The study recruited 1,007 women from 25 institutions who had a recent diagnosis of cancer in one breast. 969 women completed the study, which began in April 2003. All of the women enrolled had a negative mammogram and negative clinical breast exam of the opposite breast within 90 days prior to the MRI. Of the 33 contralateral breast cancers diagnosed in the study, 30 cancers, or 91 percent, were diagnosed as a result of MRI. Researchers found that the added benefit of MRI was consistent, regardless of a woman’s cancer type, age, or breast density.

“This study gives us a clearer indication that if an MRI of the opposite breast is negative, women diagnosed with cancer in only one breast can more confidently opt against having a double, or bilateral, mastectomy,” said NCI Director John E. Niederhuber, M.D.

“We can now identify the vast majority of contralateral cancers at the time of a woman’s initial breast cancer diagnosis,” said Constance Lehman, M.D., Ph.D., principal investigator of the ACRIN Breast MRI Trial, professor of radiology and director of breast imaging at the University of Washington and Seattle Cancer Care Alliance. “This means that instead of those women having another cancer diagnosis years after their initial treatment, we can diagnose and treat those opposite breast cancers at the time of the initial diagnosis.”

Researchers are hopeful that with breast MRI’s strong ability to predict the absence of a tumor, they can avoid some unnecessary mastectomies and provide women with more reassurance that the breast is disease free. “Although no imaging tool is perfect, if the MRI is negative, the chance of cancer in that breast is extremely low. A potential outcome that we would be delighted to see is fewer unnecessary bilateral mastectomies,” said Lehman.

Researchers are optimistic that there may be long-term savings to patients, and to the health care system, due to MRI’s ability to detect cancer in both breasts prior to therapy — which may result in fewer rounds of chemotherapy and breast surgeries.

Constantine Gatsonis, Ph.D., the study’s statistician and director of Brown University’s Center for Statistical Sciences, Providence, RI, said, "The size and scope of this study — which followed nearly a thousand women receiving care in a variety of medical settings — means that its findings are definitive and broadly applicable. Women can be assured that a negative MRI means that their chances of having a second cancer diagnosed within a year is miniscule.”

For most women, the fear of a second cancer diagnosis is quite high. The researchers are hoping that breast MRI can improve a woman’s quality of life both at the time of her diagnosis and the years following.

In the United States, breast cancer is the most frequent newly diagnosed non-skin cancer in women, and the second leading cause of cancer-related death. An estimated 178,480 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer and an estimated 40,460 women will die of the disease in the U.S. in 2007.

For a Q&A on MRIs for contralateral breast cancer, please go to http://www.cancer.gov/newscenter/pressreleases/MRIContralateralQ&A.

The protocol for this study can be found at http://www.cancer.gov/search/ViewClinicalTrials.aspx?cdrid=285698&version=HealthProfessional&protocolsearchid=3127490.

ACRIN is an NCI-sponsored and funded clinical trials cooperative group made up of investigators from over 100 academic and community-based facilities in the United States, as well as several abroad. ACRIN’s mission is to develop information through clinical trials of diagnostic imaging and image-guided therapeutic procedures that will result in the earlier diagnosis of cancer, allay the concerns of those who do not have cancer, and increase the length and improve the quality of life for cancer patients. ACRIN administration is headquartered at the Philadelphia office of the American College of Radiology and is under the leadership of Network Chair Bruce J. Hillman, MD, and Constantine Gatsonis, Ph.D. the Network Statistician. The ACRIN Biostatistics Center is located at Brown University in Providence, RI.

The American College of Radiology (ACR) is a national professional organization serving more than 32,000 diagnostic radiologists, radiation oncologists, interventional radiologists, nuclear medicine physicians, and medical physicists, with programs focusing on the practice of radiology and the delivery of comprehensive health care services. Further information on the ACR can be found at www.acr.org.

For more information about cancer, visit http://www.cancer.gov, or call NCI's Cancer Information Service at 1-800-4 CANCER.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) — The Nation's Medical Research Agency — includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. It is the primary federal agency for conducting and supporting basic, clinical and translational medical research, and it investigates the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit www.nih.gov.


*Lehman CD, Gatsonis C, Kuhl CK, Hendrick RE, Pisano ED, Hanna L, Peacock S, Smazal SF, Maki DD, Julian TB, DePeri ER, Bluemke DA, Schnall MD, for the American College of Radiology Imaging Network Trial 6667 Investigators Group. MRI Evaluation of the Contralateral Breast in Women Recently Diagnosed with Breast Cancer. NEJM. Vol. 356, No.13. March 29, 2007.
NIH logo   Home > News & Events
Subscribe to receive future NIH news releases.