The NIH intramural research program has shifted all non-mission-critical laboratory operations to a maintenance phase in order to promote physical distancing and diminished transmission risk of COVID-19. Effective Monday, March 23, 2020, only mission-critical functions within NIH research laboratories will be supported.

Multimedia

Videos

Through the ACTIV program, NIH is working with many partners to develop safe and effective vaccines for COVID-19. Learn how candidate vaccines are tested through the different phases of clinical trials.

What is a Phase 3 Clinical Trial for a Vaccine Candidate?

Through the ACTIV program, NIH is working with many partners to develop safe and effective vaccines for COVID-19. Learn how candidate vaccines are tested through the different phases of clinical trials.

Learn about monoclonal antibodies, which are manufactured antibodies to replicate those naturally occurring in some people after coronavirus infection. Monoclonal antibodies are being tested in NIH clinical trials as a potential treatment for COVID-19.

Monoclonal Antibodies

Learn about monoclonal antibodies, which are being tested in NIH clinical trials as a potential treatment for COVID-19. Learn more about these trials

Graphics

NIH and Moderna launched a Phase 3 clinical trial in July 2020 to study COVID-19 vaccine candidate mRNA-1273.

NIH and Moderna launched a Phase 3 clinical trial in July 2020 to study COVID-19 vaccine candidate mRNA-1273. Learn more

In August of 2020 NIH announced ACTIV-2, a Phase 2/3 clinical trial to study the use of monoclonal antibodies as a treatment for COVID-19 in an outpatient setting for people with mild to moderate COVID-19.

In August 2020 NIH announced ACTIV-2, a Phase 2/3 clinical trial to study the use of monoclonal antibodies as a treatment for COVID-19 in an outpatient setting for people with mild to moderate COVID-19.

In August of 2020 NIH announced a Phase 3 clinical trial to study the use of monoclonal antibodies as a treatment for hospitalized COVID-19 patients as part of ACTIV-3.

In August 2020 NIH announced a Phase 3 clinical trial to study the use of monoclonal antibodies as a treatment for hospitalized COVID-19 patients as part of ACTIV-3. Learn more

Photos

Fauci, Hepburn, and Collins in Hallway

From left to right: Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of NIH’s National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Dr. Matt Hepburn, Vaccine Lead for Operation Warp Speed, and NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins  at NIH Building 1 on July 27, 2020, after a press briefing on the Phase 3 trial launch of the investigational vaccine mRNA-1273 for COVID-19. (NIH News Release) Photo credit: NIH

This page last reviewed on August 25, 2020